RSS

Quick to Hear, Slow to Speak

30 Jul

Image

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/07/30/daily-prompt-heated/

When was the last time your walked away from a discussion, only to think of The Perfect Comeback hours later? Recreate the scene for us, and use your winning line.

This prompt is a hard one for me.  The problem is that I have always been very witty and able to think fast on my feet.  So, not having a comeback has never really been much of a problem for me.  My problem has been more of holding back and not saying the sarcastic jab.  

It has been a “talent” I have learned to moderate over the years.  I have learned most times it is better to let it slide, so to speak, then to always get the last word.

It reminds me of the Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan movie You’ve Got Mail.  In the movie, Hanks’ character (Mr. Fox) is talking to Ryan’s character about this very thing.  She is lamenting the fact that she often becomes befuddled at the very moment a good zinger would come in handy.  He tells her, he has no problem saying exactly what he wants, when he wants.  He then warns her that such a “talent” is not always a good thing.

This prompt goes along with the men’s Bible study I’ve been teaching on Tuesday evenings.  We have discussed James’ exhortation to control the tongue.  James argues it is a small member, but it is capable of much damage.  He likens it to a wildfire, burning out of control.

It is like the old adage says, God gave you two ears and one mouth; so you should listen twice as much as you talk!  How much better a world would it be if we all followed this sage advice?

Know this, my beloved brothers:  let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger . . . [a]nd the tongue is a fire, a world of unrighteousness.  The tongue is set among our members, staining the whole body, setting on fire the entire course of life, and set on fire by hell.  (James 1.19; 3.6)

Advertisements
 
1 Comment

Posted by on July 30, 2013 in Daily Prompt, Grace in the Everyday

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

One response to “Quick to Hear, Slow to Speak

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: